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Funding for the Occupational Structure of Britain c.1379-1911

Funding for the Occupational Structure of Britain c.1379-1911

We gratefully acknowledge the following grants:

2017 Economic History Society, £2,000 and Ellen McArthur Trust £1,000 awarded to Leigh Shaw-Taylor for European Network for Comparative History of Population Geography and Occupational Structure (ENCHPOPGOS), Inaugural Conference, Robinson College, Cambridge, 25th-27th September 2017.
2017 Cambridge Humanities Research Grant, Romola Davenport is PI. Leigh Shaw-Taylor and E.A. Wrigley are CIs. The pre-census population geography of England and Wales, a pilot study, £20k
2017 Cambridge Humanities Research Grant, awarded to Leigh Shaw-Taylor, Transport and Economic Development in England and Wales 1680-1911, £20k
2017 Cambridge Humanities Research Gant, awarded to Amy Erickson, The male occupational structure of London and Middlesex 1550-1700, £19k.
2017 Keynes Fund, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, Market Failures and State Successes in Public Health and Highways 1830-1911, Toke Aidt is PI, Romola Davenport and Toke Aidt are CIs. £50k about £6k of which relates to the Occupational Structure of Britain c.1379-1911 research program
2017 Joint Research and Usage Centre Program grant, Hitotsubashi University, awarded to Leigh Shaw-Taylor, Petty's Law Reconsidered. Economic Development and Changing Sectoral shares of the Labour Force. 600,000 Yen (c.£3.6k).
2016-2018 Isaac Newton Trust. Transport, energy and urbanization c.1670-1911. £57,380. Leigh Shaw-Taylor is PI. Dr Paul Warde and Professor E.A. Wrigley are CIs.
2016 Cambridge Humanities Research Grant, awarded to Amy Erickson, Occupations and employment relations in 18th-century London, £20k.
2014-16 Higher Education Impact Fund awarded to Leigh Shaw-Taylor, Cambridge e-Resources for teaching economic history and historical economic geography in secondary schools. £34k.
2013-2017 The Leverhulme Trust, Transport, Urbanization and Economic Development c.1670-1911: £278k. Leigh Shaw-Taylor was PI. Professor Sir E.A Wrigley and Prof Dan Bogart (UC Irvine) were Co-Is.
2012-2013 British Academy. Mid-Career Fellowship. The Occupational Structure of Britain and its Comparative Context 1700-1911: £115k
2011-12 The Leverhulme Trust. Emeritus Fellowship awarded to Professor Sir E.A. Wrigley. Parish-level population estimates for England and Wales prior to the nineteenth century £19,131.
2011-13 British Academy / Leverhulme Small Grant, awarde to Amy Erickson, for Pin makers, Adam Smith and the division of labour: £7,400.
2010 British Academy Conference Support, £10,000 awarded to Amy Erickson together with small grants from the Economic History Society, Ellen McArthur and G.M. Trevelyan Funds, for Women's Work in Early Modern Europe, Jesus College, Cambridge, 23-24 September
2008-2012 The Leverhume Trust, Emeritus Fellowship Mapping the population geography of England 1761-1881, awarded to E.A. Wrigley.
2009 – 2010 The Leverhulme Trust. Visiting professorship for Osamu Saito: £89k.
2008 – 2011 The Leverhulme Trust. The Occupational Structure of England and Wales c.1379-c1729 (F/09/774/9): £505k. F/09 674/G. Leigh Shaw-Taylor was Principal Investigator. Prof. Sir E.A. Wrigley and Prof. R.M. Smith were co-investigators.
2007 – 2021 British Academy Research Project: The Occupational Structure of Britain c.1379-1911. C.£5k per annum: open ended period, subject to qinquennial review. Leigh Shaw-Taylor is PI. E.A. Wrigley and Amy Erickson are CIs.
2006 – 2009 Economic and Social Research Council grant: The Occupational Structure of Nineteenth Century Britain: £767,000. Grant RES-000-23-1579. Leigh Shaw-Taylor was Principal Investigator. E.A. Wrigley was co-investigator. Project judged 'outstanding' by the E.S.R.C.
2003 – 2006 Economic and Social Research Council grant: Male Occupational Change and Economic Growth in England 1750 to 1851: £597,000. Grant RES 000-23-0131. Leigh Shaw-Taylor was Principal Investigator. Prof. Sir E.A. Wrigley was co-investigator. Project judged 'outstanding' by the E.S.R.C.