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Seminars

Seminars

The group runs a range of seminars.

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

The seminar meets on Wednesday lunchtimes at 13:15.

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 20th February 2019, 1.15pm - Alice Reid (University of Cambridge)
'If only this could be my last': new ideas about reducing family size during the demographic transition
Venue: Room 12, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Wednesday 6th March 2019, 1.15pm - Bob Bennett, Harry Smith, Carry van Lieshout, Piero Montebruno (University of Cambridge)
The Age of Entrepreneurship: whole-population analysis of trends in entrepreneurship 1851-1911 from the censuses
Venue: Room 12, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History

Mondays at 12:30 pm in Room 5, Faculty of History

All welcome.

Convenors: Ying Dai (Murray Edwards College,yd282) and Emelyn Rude (King’s College, er496)

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 25th February 2019, 12.30pm - Moritz Kaiser, University of Aberdeen
The Origins of ‘Penitents’: The Socio-Economic Backgrounds of the Inmates in an English Anglican Magdalen Home, 1848-1914
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 4th March 2019, 12.30pm - Eliska, Udayan, and Merel, University of Cambridge
MPhil Presentations
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 11th March 2019, 12.30pm - Mustafe, TBD, University of Cambridge
MPhil Presentations
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Core Seminar in Economic and Social History

Seminars begin at 5pm in the Old Library, Darwin College (entrance on Silver St). Each seminar is followed by drinks and (usually) dinner with the speaker. All are welcome.

This seminar is a combination of nine seminar programmes:
Medieval economic and social history; Early modern economic and social history; Modern economic and social history; Quantitative history; Global Economic History; The Centre for Financial History; The Centre for History and Economics; The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure; The Centre for Quantitative Economic History.
Their specialist seminar programmes do not run in Michaelmas term, but each meets separately again in Lent and (sometimes) Easter.

The core seminar is grateful for the support of Darwin College and for the generosity of the Trevelyan Fund.

Seminar co-ordinators: Duncan Needham (djn33@cam.ac.uk), Amy Erickson (ale25@cam.ac.uk), and Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk)

Economic and Social History at Cambridge: www.econsoc.hist.cam.ac.uk

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Quantitative History Seminar

Supported by the Centre for History and Economics and the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History).

The seminar meets on Wednesdays at 13.15 in Room 12, Faculty of History.

Convenor: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk)

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 27th February 2019, 1.15pm - Sir Roderick Floud
Purchasing Paradise: gardens in the English economy, 1660-1815
Venue: Room 12, Faculty of History

The landscape garden has been said to be England’s greatest contribution to European culture. Behind the hyperbole lies a century and a half of garden making, from the enormous formal gardens of the Restoration period and the time of William and Mary, which were then swept away by the landscape movement typified by Capability Brown and complemented finally by the more restrained designs of Humphry Repton and the picturesque school. These gardens represent the expenditure of billions of pounds, in modern values, in what is arguably the most conspicuous example of all of the luxury consumption of the period, literally reshaping the English countryside. But who paid for them, with what sources of funds, what was the nature of the industry which produced them and what was the impact on the economy? This paper explores these questions and in particular the role of public expenditure as well as the technological innovations which were spawned. These are topics which have been entirely ignored by both economic and garden historians but which throw new light on the economics, politics and social evolution of the long eighteenth century.

Additional seminars of interest to Campop members

Additional seminars of interest to Campop members.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 20th February 2019, 5.00pm - Miriam Müller (University of Birmingham)
The freedom to act incompetently and the right to be fed suitably: Childhood and agency in the medieval English village
Venue: Walters Room, Selwyn College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 21st February 2019, 5.00pm - Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist (Stockholm)
European building activity in times of crisis, 13th-17th centuries
Venue: History Faculty Room 12

Abstract not available