skip to primary navigation skip to content
 

Seminars

Seminars

The group runs a range of seminars.

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.

Seminars will take place in person in the Faculty of History and on Zoom at 1.15pm. Sandwiches and fruit will be available from 1.00pm.

The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

Convenors: Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk), Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk), Hannaliis Jaadla (hj309@cam.ac.uk) and Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk).

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 29th May 2024, 1.15pm - Phil Slavin (University of Stirling)
Plague strikes back: The Pestis Secunda of 1361–62 and its demographic consequences in England and Wales
Venue: Board Room, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Graduate Workshop in Economic and Social History

The Workshop meets alternate Mondays, 1pm.

Convened by Jerome Gasson (jttg2), Yasser Alvi (ya326), and Emily Chung (evc28)

To join the mailing list, please complete the Google Form:
https://forms.gle/RcAx1t4WWY1yL2RA9

Twitter: @EconomicandSoc2

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Core Seminar in Economic and Social History

Seminars take place on Thursdays at 5:15 pm in Room 5 of the History Faculty. All are welcome, either in person or online.

The Core seminar combines multiple seminars: Medieval Economic and Social History; Early Modern Economic and
Social History; Modern Economic and Social History and Policy; African Economic History; Global Economic History;
Quantitative History; Financial History; the Centre for History and Economics; and the Cambridge Group for the
History of Population and Social Structure. Their specialist seminar programmes do not run in Michaelmas term, but
each meets separately again in the Lent and (sometimes) Easter terms.

Seminar convenor: Amy Erickson (ale25@cam.ac.uk)

Economic and Social History at Cambridge: www.econsoc.hist.cam.ac.uk

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Quantitative History Seminar

Supported by the Centre for History and Economics and the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History).

The seminar meets on Wednesdays at 1.15pm in the Faculty of History and on Zoom.
Sandwiches and fruit will be available from 1.00pm.

Convenors: Aleksandra Dul (amd217@cam.ac.uk), Alexis Litvine (adl38), Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk)

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Wednesday 22nd May 2024, 1.15pm - Stephen Broadberry (Oxford University), co-authored with Hanhui Guan (Peking University)
Regional Variation of GDP per Head within China, 1080-1850: Implications for the Great Divergence Debate
Venue: Room 5 (Faculty of History) and on Zoom

We examine regional variation in Chinese GDP per head for five benchmark years from the Song dynasty to the Qing. For the Ming and Qing dynasties, we provide a breakdown of regional GDP per head across seven macro regions, establishing that East Central China was the richest macro region. In addition, we provide data on the Yangzi Delta, the core of East Central China, widely seen as the richest part of China since 1400. Yangzi Delta GDP per head was 64 to 67 per cent higher than in China as a whole for three of the four Ming and Qing benchmarks, and 52 per cent higher during the late Ming. For the Northern Song dynasty, although it is not possible to derive a full regional breakdown, we provide data for Kaifeng Fu, the region containing the capital city as well as the Yangzi Delta. GDP per head in Kaifeng Fu was more than twice the level of China as a whole and higher than in the Yangzi Delta. Combined with aggregate data for GDP per head, these estimates suggest that China was the leading economy in the world during the Song dynasty and that the Great Divergence began around 1700 as the leading region of China fell decisively behind the leading region of Europe. They are also consistent with a shift in the economic centre of gravity from the north to the south between the Northern Song and Ming dynasties.

Join us on Zoom:
https://cam-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/81628787646?pwd=QkNCenBVd1JTbDExWEthU1FOY05zUT09

Meeting ID: 816 2878 7646

Passcode: 551855

# Wednesday 5th June 2024, 1.15pm - TBC
TBC
Venue: Room 5 (Faculty of History) and on Zoom

Join us on Zoom:

https://cam-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/81628787646?pwd=QkNCenBVd1JTbDExWEthU1FOY05zUT09

Meeting ID: 816 2878 7646 Passcode: 551855

Additional seminars of interest to Campop members

Additional seminars of interest to Campop members.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 23rd May 2024, 5.00pm - Phil Withington, University of Sheffield
The intoxicant economy in early modern England
Venue: History Faculty Room 11

This paper will trace the material history and commodification of alcohols, tobacco, caffeine, opiates, and sugar between the later 16th and early 18th centuries. It will use food systems analysis to begin thinking about the causes and consequences of economic change.