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Seminars

Seminars

The group runs a range of seminars.

The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series

Research seminar series run by the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure.
The support of the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History) is gratefully acknowledged.

The seminar meets on Tuesdays at 4pm.

Convenors: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk), Romola Davenport (rjd23@cam.ac.uk) and Alice Reid (alice.reid@geog.cam.ac.uk).

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History

Mondays at 12:30 pm in Room 5, Faculty of History, West Road (except 15th October in Room 6)

All welcome. A complimentary sandwich lunch is provided.

Convenors: Ying Dai (Murray Edwards College,yd282) and Emelyn Rude (King’s College, er496)

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Monday 22nd October 2018, 12.30pm - Yiwen Qiu (University of Cambridge)
Industrial development paths from an evolutionary perspective: the Chinese case, 1998-2013
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 29th October 2018, 12.30pm - Yushu Geng (University of Cambridge)
Obscenity and the Politics of Moral Regulation in China and Singapore, 1919-1937
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 5th November 2018, 12.30pm - Yasmin Shearmur (University of Cambridge)
European integration and immigration policy, French and British experiences, 1976-1992
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

This paper examines the making of immigration policy in France and Britain during the 1980s. More  specifically, it examines whether and how European developments fed back into domestic immigration policy. Beginning in the late 1970s and carrying throughout the 1980s, there was a burst of activity at the European level, from the informal, intergovernmental cooperation between interior ministers of the TREVI group; to the Schengen agreements, which abolished internal borders for participating countries; to Maastricht, which incorporated developments of the previous decade into expanded and formalized EU structures.  What, historically, have France and Britain’s priorities regarding immigration been? How is immigration policy made, given that it must respond to contrary imperatives, even within government? Does modern immigration policy reflect Europe’s democratic deficit? How well have states ever been able to implement immigration policy? If poorly, what function does declaring an immigration policy serve? 

# Monday 12th November 2018, 12.30pm - Michalis Bardanis (University of Ioannina, Greece)
Brick and tile making in Athens, Greece, during 20th century
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 19th November 2018, 12.30pm - Mostafa Abdelaal (University of Cambridge)
Years of Turbulence, Years of Hope: Central African Copperbelt and the Industrial Development in Congo-Léopoldville and Zambia, from the Political Independence to the Economic Nationalization
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

The economic nationalization occurred in Congo-Léopoldville and Zambia roughly after five years of their independence, in 1966 and 1969 respectively.  During the political clouts and the economic vicissitudes that took place in both countries, the Central African Copperbelt (CAC) contributed to a far extent in shaping the historical events. However, these fateful years lie between the political independence to the nationalization of mining companies have been received little attention from historians.  The quest for Africanization the economy and from the European domination became extremely fiercer than the political independence. A group of factors explain the challenges faced by national governments in dirigisme their national economy such as; the global economic relationships, capital flight and foreign direct investment, global copper prices, Africa’s lacking to the technical experience and management of mining companies. This paper will investigate the colonial/national perceptions of industrial development in late colonial/ the immediate post-colonial years, more specifically the weight of the CAC in the colonial/national contexts, from development planning to implementation. A part of this perception could be traced since the colonial authorities Belgians/British set up decennial developmental plans in the 1940s and 50s which extended to another long-term plan but was curtailed by the advent of independence. On the other hand, the national authorities replaced these plans with the transnational and first development plans in Zambia and a chaotic political situation in Congo. Significantly, there were high expectations by African in both countries for reaping the benefits of independence, higher wages and advancement of labour, and this might explain the crucial role of mining areas. Such a role need to be examined from comparative contexts, not limited to the mining industry, but significantly to the CAC role in the question of industrial development in the early years of independence.

# Monday 26th November 2018, 12.30pm - Alex Tertzakian (University of Cambridge)
The diffusion of mechanised technologies in the West Riding of Yorkshire textile industry c.1780­‐1911 and its impact on employment and wages
Venue: Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

Core Seminar in Economic and Social History

Seminars begin at 5pm in the Old Library, Darwin College (entrance on Silver St). Each seminar is followed by drinks and (usually) dinner with the speaker. All are welcome.

This seminar is a combination of nine seminar programmes:
Medieval economic and social history; Early modern economic and social history; Modern economic and social history; Quantitative history; Global Economic History; The Centre for Financial History; The Centre for History and Economics; The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure; The Centre for Quantitative Economic History.
Their specialist seminar programmes do not run in Michaelmas term, but each meets separately again in Lent and (sometimes) Easter.

The core seminar is grateful for the support of Darwin College and for the generosity of the Trevelyan Fund.

Seminar co-ordinators: Duncan Needham (djn33@cam.ac.uk), Amy Erickson (ale25@cam.ac.uk), and Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk)

Economic and Social History at Cambridge: www.econsoc.hist.cam.ac.uk

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 25th October 2018, 5.00pm - Professor Patrick O’Brien (London School of Economics)
Britain's wars with France, 1793-1815 and their contribution to the consolidation of the Industrial Revolution
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 15th November 2018, 5.00pm - Dr Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz (University of Amsterdam)
Conflict management in northern Europe, 1350-1570
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 22nd November 2018, 5.00pm - Dr Eilidh Garrett (Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure)
Movers and stayers: populations, movement and measurement in historical demography
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 29th November 2018, 5.00pm - Professor John Styles (University of Hertfordshire)
Inducements to technical innovation in the British Industrial Revolution: markets, materiality and the invention of the spinning jenny
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

Quantitative History Seminar

Supported by the Centre for History and Economics and the Trevelyan Fund (Faculty of History).

The seminar meets on Tuesdays at 4pm.

Convenor: Leigh Shaw-Taylor (lmws2@cam.ac.uk)

There are no forthcoming seminars at present. Please check back here later.

You may wish to view the archive of previous seminars.

Additional seminars of interest to Campop members

Additional seminars of interest to Campop members.

View the archive of previous seminars.

# Thursday 25th October 2018, 5.00pm - Professor Patrick O’Brien (London School of Economics)
Britain's wars with France, 1793-1815 and their contribution to the consolidation of the Industrial Revolution
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 15th November 2018, 5.00pm - Dr Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz (University of Amsterdam)
Conflict management in northern Europe, 1350-1570
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 22nd November 2018, 5.00pm - Dr Eilidh Garrett (Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure)
Movers and stayers: populations, movement and measurement in historical demography
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available

# Thursday 29th November 2018, 5.00pm - Professor John Styles (University of Hertfordshire)
Inducements to technical innovation in the British Industrial Revolution: markets, materiality and the invention of the spinning jenny
Venue: Old Library, Darwin College

Abstract not available