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Graduate Workshops in Economic and Social History: archive

Return to the list of forthcoming seminars.

# Monday 6th March 2017, 12.30pm - Speaker to be confirmed
MPhil Presentations Part II
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 27th February 2017, 12.30pm - Speaker to be confirmed
MPhil Presentations Part I
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 13th February 2017, 12.30pm - Francisco Beltrán Tapia (Cambridge)
Where are the missing girls? Gender discrimination in 19th-century Spain
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 30th January 2017, 12.30pm - Ana Avino-de-Pablo (Ghent)
The Treaty of Westminster: a turning point for the Anglo Iberian trade in the late 15th century?
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 28th November 2016, 12.30pm - Kathryn Gary (Lund University)
Men's daily and annual wages in early modern Sweden
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 21st November 2016, 12.30pm - Walter Jansson (University of Cambridge)
Finance and regional growth in Britain, 1870-1913
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 14th November 2016, 12.30pm - Simon Gallagher (University of Cambridge)
Family structure and the admission of children to the workhouse in post-famine Ireland
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 7th November 2016, 12.30pm - Niccolò Serri (University of Cambridge)
Welfare and industrial conflict in the Italian automobile industry, 1968-1975
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 31st October 2016, 12.30pm - Luis Almenar (University of Valencia)
Eating and drinking as a medieval peasant. Innovations in table manners in late medieval rural Valencia
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 24th October 2016, 12.30pm - Cheng Yang (University of Cambridge)
Occupational structure of late Imperial China, 1738-1899
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 17th October 2016, 12.30pm - Alain Naef (University of Cambridge)
Does sterilised central bank intervention have long term effects on exchange rate? The case of the British Exchange Equalisation Account, 1952-1972
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 10th October 2016, 12.30pm - Spike Gibbs (University of Cambridge)
Patterns of manorial office holding at late medieval and early modern Little Downham, 1300-1600
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 29th February 2016, 12.30pm - Leslie Chang, Jacapo Satori, Ryan Ripamonti, Emiliano Travieso, and Aditya Basrur (University of Cambridge)
M. Phil Presentations II. Financial and Business History
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 22nd February 2016, 12.30pm - Daniel Allemann, Stephanie Ternullo, Rosa Hodgkin, Connor Lempriere, and Callum Easton (University of Cambridge)
M.Phil Presentations I. Economics, Politics and Policy
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 25th January 2016, 12.30pm - Sebastian Keibek (University of Cambridge)
The male occupational structure of England and Wales, 1700-1850
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 18th January 2016, 12.30pm - Paco Ruzzante (University of Cambridge)
Beveridge calling: The social insurance and allied services and the Mediterranean welfare model, 1942-1950s
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 30th November 2015, 12.30pm - Alice Dolan (Institute of Historical Research)
What was linen? Flax and hemp at home and work in 18th-century England
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 23rd November 2015, 12.30pm - Josh Ivinson (Cambridge)
The local and transnational organisation of the nascent Newfoundland dry cod trade, 1550-1650
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 16th November 2015, 12.30pm - Nikita Dmtriev (Pantheon-Sorbonne)
Land market and the long 12th century transformation in Foligno county
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 9th November 2015, 12.30pm - Craig McMahon (Cambridge)
A comparative analysis of payday lending in America and Britain, 1900-1930s
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 2nd November 2015, 12.30pm - Partha Shil (Cambridge)
Recruitment of constabulary labour in colonial Bengal 1861-1900
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 26th October 2015, 12.30pm - Toby Salisbury (Cambridge)
Poaching and sedition in thirteenth century England
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 19th October 2015, 12.30pm - Miguel Morin (Cambridge)
Adapting to workplace technological change over the long run: Evidence from US longitudinal data
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 12th October 2015, 12.30pm - Mike Schraer (Cambridge)
Land and credit in the asset allocations of the Jews in late 14th-century Zaragoza
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 9th March 2015, 12.30pm - Alexandra Digby/Neil Gandhi (Cambridge)
MPhil Presentations
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 2nd March 2015, 12.30pm - Ellen Nye/Tim Rudnicki/Cheng Yang (Cambridge)
MPhil Presentations
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 26th January 2015, 12.30pm - Marta Musso (Cambridge)
The Oil Industry in the Algerian Decolonisation Process
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 1st December 2014, 12.30pm - Hillary Taylor (Yale)
The Affective Economy of Social Relations in Early Modern England
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 24th November 2014, 12.30pm - Stephen Pierpoint (Cambridge)
The Fiscal-Military State and the Land Tax - Observations from Kent and London
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 17th November 2014, 12.30pm - Corinne Boter (Wageningen)
Ideal vs Reality? The Ideal of the Breadwinner-Homemaker Household in Industrializing Regions in the Netherlands, ca. 1890
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 3rd November 2014, 12.30pm - Mingjie Xu (Cambridge)
Disorder and Rebellion in Cambridgeshire in 1381
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 27th October 2014, 12.30pm - Imogen Wedd (Cambridge)
Reconstructing Yeoman Communities in Early Modern Kent
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 20th October 2014, 12.30pm - Keith Sugden (Cambridge)
Note change of speaker
The impact of mechanization upon female and male employment in the English textile industry, circa 1780-1851
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 13th October 2014, 12.30pm - Carolyn Dougherty (York)
Note change of start time: 12.30pm
Carrying Trade
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 10th March 2014, 1.00pm - Sophie McGeevor (Cambridge)
What can autobiographies tell us about women's time-use in 19th century England?
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 17th February 2014, 1.00pm - Vellore Arti (Oxford)
"The Dust Was Long in Settling": Human Capital and the Lasting Impact of the American Dust Bowl
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 3rd February 2014, 1.00pm - Caroline Rusterholtz (University of Fribourg)
The transformation of the costs of children and its impact on reproductive behaviour: a comparative analysis of the second demographic transition in Switzerland
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 27th January 2014, 1.00pm - Sebastian Keibek (Cambridge)
Probate records as a source of occupational information
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 2nd December 2013, 1.00pm - Lyn Boothman (Cambridge)
Office holding, social status and stability in a small town, 1661-1861
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 25th November 2013, 1.00pm - Simon Abernethy (Cambridge)
Deceptive data? The New Survey of London Life and Labour, 1928-31
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 18th November 2013, 1.00pm - Edmond Smith (Cambridge)
The multiplicitous networks of the East India Company, 1599-1603
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 11th November 2013, 1.00pm - Adam Crymble (Cambridge)
Measuring Immigrant Crime in London: The Irish 1801-1820
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 4th November 2013, 1.00pm - Stephen Pierpoint (Cambridge)
17th & 18th century land taxes in England; 'hardly changed since the middle ages' or cutting edge technology. A Kent case study
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 28th October 2013, 1.00pm - Ellen Potter (Cambridge)
Female employment in the nineteenth century censuses: Methods, pitfalls, and prostitutes
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 21st October 2013, 1.00pm - Xuesheng You (Cambridge)
'Kin-servant' in 1881 British Census Enumerators' Books: Actual Work or Random Enumeration
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 14th October 2013, 1.00pm - Anne Hanley (Cambridge)
Venereology at the Polyclinic, 1899-1914
Venue: Seminar Room 5, Faculty of History

Abstract not available

# Monday 17th June 2013, 1.00pm - Keith Sugden, Cambridge
The Male Occupational Structure of Norwich, circa 1720-1841: Evidence from Quarter Session and Other Records
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

The timing of the decline of the Norwich stuffs industry remains the subject of debate. Some believed it occurred during the eighteenth century, some think it held on until well into the nineteenth, post mechanization of worsted manufacture. This paper utilizes a number of occupational sources to pin down the date in an attempt to throw some light onto the discussion.

# Monday 25th February 2013, 1.00pm - Atiyab Sultan
Impoverishing development? Institution-building in Colonial Punjab (1849-1947)
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

Available Soon

# Monday 19th November 2012, 1.00pm - Xuesheng You (Cambridge Group)
Widows' Work: Some Evidence from the 1881 Census Enumerators' Books
Venue: Seminar room, Departement of Geography main building, Downing Site

Available Soon

# Monday 29th October 2012, 1.00pm - Charles Read (Cambridge)
The Irish Famine: Britain’s Biggest Economic Policy Failure?
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

“The Almighty, indeed, sent the potato blight, but the English created the Famine”. (John Mitchel) Nationalist and revisionist historians have furiously debated British culpability for the famine, instead of examining modern Britain’s worst social and economic disaster in terms of economic policy. This paper takes this new approach to topic, arguing that instead of the British running a “laissez-faire” policy towards the famine, there was a consistent relief policy based on supply-side ideas popular at the time. But these policies misunderstood the underlying cause of the famine, a collapse in monetary incomes, which instead accidentally made Ireland’s problems in the 1840s much worse.

# Monday 22nd October 2012, 1.00pm - Kate Boehme (Cambridge)
Linking Business and Philanthropy: The Social Concerns and Philanthropic Behaviours of Bombay's Mercantile Elite, 1845-1870
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

In the nineteenth century, Bombay became a hub for the export of raw Indian goods such as opium and cotton to overseas locations across the Indian Ocean and to as far away as China. In particular, the dramatic increase in commercial activities brought about by the trade with China facilitated the emergence of a powerful Indian merchant class that possessed great wealth and exerted considerable influence in local political and social matters. This group has been credited by some historians as engaging in some of the earliest coordinated public activity in India and, later in the century, developed coherent economically nationalist discourse. In this paper I will explore the development of this group’s civic mindedness and emerging focus on “Indian” issues through the lens of their philanthropic activities. Through an analysis of their patterns of giving it is possible to gain a greater understanding of how such donations were made through the cooperative efforts of Indian mercantilists from a number of different caste backgrounds, as well as how such giving indicated a growing concern with the general welfare of the Indian community in Bombay.

# Monday 28th May 2012, 12.45pm - Sandra de la Torre Gonzalo (University of Zaragoza)
Business and politics in late medieval Iberia: mercantile elites in the Kingdom of Aragon (1380-1430)
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

Recent works on late-medieval commerce in the Crown of Aragon have made clear the importance of a group of businessmen settled in Zaragoza, the capital of the kingdom of Aragon. At the end of the fourteenth century and beginning of the fifteenth, this small group of businessmen intervened on a large scale in the financing of the state, principally through the market of the institutional public debt and hiring the commercial taxes of the kingdom. Their important businesses suppose the mobilization of very high sums of money and the formation of leading commercial companies that promote mercantile and family connections that spread over the whole kingdom and the Crown from the interior of the Peninsula and the south of France towards the Mediterranean Sea.
The aim of this paper is to provide an overview and an analysis of the political role of this financial and commercial elite. Therefore, we are interested in the targets and the strategies of these people, and their capacity for political performance, expressed in their patrimonies (financial, mercantile, territorial), professional activities, family behaviors and the construction of social networks.
My prosopographical research offers an intermediate approach between the studies on the individual protagonists and the large social groups, and has proved its efficiency in analyzing dispersed and fragmentary sources like the ones we have at our disposal.

# Monday 21st May 2012, 12.45pm - Irene Haycock (University of Cambridge)
Aspects of Agrarian Change in South Staffordshire: A Case Study of Kingswinford, 1650 to 1750
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

This paper examines the nature and extent of agrarian change and early industrial change in the parish of Kingswinford, south Staffordshire (now the West Midlands) in the early modern period. It addresses the dearth of work on pastoral regions as opposed to the much studied arable eastern and southern areas of England. Staffordshire is a county renowned for its precocious early population growth, and early industrial development in minerals such as coal, iron, metal-wares, and glass. It is a classic area of by-employment where, according to Thirsk, farming households took up domestic manufacture when work was slack. Using probate documents (and parish registers for a wider context) a quantitative analysis finds that the wealth of the whole sample of the parish and that of farmers and of the by-employed significantly decreased over time; the wealth-gap between the farmers and industrialists increasingly narrowed. The incentive to become by-employed must lie with the industrialists rather than with farming households, since the farmers were the richer of the two according to gross inventory wealth. However, there were proportionately less of the inventoried population practising by-employment as time progressed.
With regard to changing farming patterns in a predominately pastoral region, the proportions of those involved in mixed farming and keeping livestock significantly decreased over time, particularly in sheep husbandry. The proportion of those farming, in terms of both those with an appropriate occupational designator or with the accoutrements of husbandry appraised in an inventory, appeared to be decreasing in the area with reasons for this decline difficult to determine.

# Monday 5th March 2012, 12.45pm - Richard Jones (University of Cambridge)
The Curious Case of Yorkshire Luddism
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

This argument-driven paper will probe the industrial precedents and
cultural legacy of machine breaking in the West Riding of Yorkshire during
the spring of 1812. The central analysis will characterise Luddism as a
conservative economic and social phenomenon with a provenance in the sense
of entitlement found in earlier trade societies, and argue against seeing
the movement as part of the broader sweep of nineteenth-century political
development.

Although the paper will focus on Luddism in Yorkshire, it will be argued
that the analysis and conclusions can be (substantively) extended to the
other industrial regions in which unrest occurred. A range of evidential
classes will be harnessed in support of this argument, including Luddite
letters, prosecution papers from the Home Office and Treasury Solicitor
deposits at Kew, judicial records from Yorkshire, and a corpus of regional
fiction.

# Monday 27th February 2012, 12.45pm - David Filtness (University of Cambridge)
Schools of Industry and Habits of Industriousness: Making childhood pay in the early Nineteenth Century
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

Amid the wars and economic distress of the late Eighteenth and
early Nineteenth centuries, an influential paradigm shift was occurring
whereby a governing ethic of paternalistic moral economy transitioned into
one of political economy, entailing a discursive re-imagining of the poor
as those who existed in a condition of poverty rather than as individuals
who were poor. This subtle recalibration of the terms of the poor-law
debate drew on recent trends casting the poor as the subject of statistics;
constituting a quantifiable and aggregated morass that could be tamed by
the application of macro-economic principles and the realisation of
self-responsibility on the part of the poor. Nowhere was this discourse
more evidenced or more influential than as it pertained to the experience
of childhood and the agency of children. Particular emphasis was placed on
the economic contribution of youngsters when as children and as future
adults, with a raft of literature detailing policies and institutions for
putting them to work. Children should be bred up into habits of industry’
appropriate to their station, placed into workhouses or ‘schools of
industry’ so as to contribute to their upkeep, and at all times supervised
and molded into ‘useful’ citizens. Impassioned rhetoric espousing the
economic exploitation of children was homologous to that exhorting that the
poor be put to work; such discourse was obsessed with economy and
cost-effectiveness, and there was no space for idle or relaxed youths in
such a schema. By examining the school of industry movement and its
contextualising literature we can understand better the social effects of
industrialisation and the Victorian moralities of self-help and charity
that did so much to pattern subsequent notions of Britishness.

# Monday 6th February 2012, 12.45pm - Lyn Boothman (University of Cambridge)
Studying the Stayers: occupation, kin links and stability
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

my PhD research examines the stable population of one Suffolk parish, Long Melford, from 1661-1861. This presentation will consider the relationship between occupation, social status, kin links and stability in the 1831-61 period and, if there’s time, relate this to evidence of social status and kin links in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

# Monday 28th November 2011, 1.00pm - Mingjie Xu (University of Cambridge)
The Revolt in Rural Cambridgeshire in 1381
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

The events of June in 1381 confronted the English government with a big scale in London. At the same time other areas similarly witnessed outbursts of concerted violent protest against authority. This paper offers an account of the events in rural Cambridgeshire. The account considers the violent incidents in the county, including their chronological and geographical distribution and various forms of violence, which establishes that the scale of the revolt in this region is limited. It also explores the rebels involved in the rebellion, including their social composition, organisation and aims, which show local peculiarities of the revolt in this county. This study, together with recent local studies on the revolt, reveals the complexities of the 1381 Revolt, which is further utilized to demonstrate the limitations of the extant two conflicting interpretations of the revolt.

# Monday 7th November 2011, 1.00pm - Simon Abernethy (University of Cambridge)
Women and Children First: A Brief Look at Working Class Women and Children Commuters in London in the 1890s and 1900s
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

When H.J. Dyos wrote his article ‘Workmen’s fares in south London 1860 – 1914’ he noted that a key problem for working class suburbanisation was the lack of subsidiary employment for women in the suburbs. This he claimed retarded working class migration from the centre. However, an examination of records from the London County Council and the Court of the Railway and Canal Commission show a small but significant number of working class women and children living in the suburbs and using workmen’s trains to get to employment in the centre. This paper examines how prevalent this practise was, the difficulty involved, and uses the limited sources available to give an indication of pay and employment.

# Monday 17th October 2011, 1.00pm - Joe Day (Cambridge Group, University of Cambridge)
"Go --West-- North-East Young Man!" Male & Female Migration in 1881
Venue: Room 101, Sir William Hardy Building, Downing Site

Abstract not available

Please note that this archive is not yet complete.